The Tale of Two Crowds

1 04 2015

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…

That is the opening line of “A Tale of Two Cities” written by Charles Dickens in the 1850s. It was about the two very different worlds of the rich and the poor during the time leading up to the French Revolution and the brutality of those two worlds colliding.

The idea of two different worlds colliding is what it feels like in the week leading up to Easter. Palm Sunday shows one crowd praising Jesus.  Then, just a few short days later another crowd is shouting for his death.

When Matthew tells the story of Palm Sunday, he mentions a prophecy told in Zechariah 9:9. It is a great reminder that God’s plan will never be swayed by the crowd. Events were unfolding according to God’s will to redeem humanity.  (Matthew’s account is found in Matthew 21:1-11)

While God may be unchanging, we are very easily swayed by the crowd. If you ever read social science experiments you will see that under the right conditions we can be made to do almost anything. It is kind of scary. Just last year Facebook got in some hot water when it was revealed that they had been manipulating news feeds to see how it would impact people’s posting habits.

That leads to our second crowd. Mark 15:11-15 tells us that the people who shouted “crucify him” had been stirred up by the religious leaders. Even though Pilate knew they were being manipulated, he went along with it and satisfied the crowd’s insistence to kill Jesus.

It is a stark reminder we live in a fallen world. We actively and passively rebel against God and we can be lead down that path very easily. Of course, we always believe it will not happen to us.

That is what Peter thought. In Mark 14:29-31 he said even if everyone else deserted Jesus he would not. I believe Peter had very good intentions but as we watch the story unfold those good intentions fail. He falls asleep when Jesus needed him to pray (Mark 14:33-40). He got violent (John 18:10) and he denied him when the pressure was on (Mark 14:66-72).

Peter is just like you and me. We often have good intentions but in the pressures of life we find ourselves defeated just as Peter did.

Luke 22:31-32 gives us more insight into what happened with Peter. Jesus warns him that Satan wanted to shift Peter like wheat. Jesus also told him that he had prayed for him. What an amazing picture! Jesus praying for Peter.

On this side of the Easter story the picture becomes even more amazing. Hebrews describes Jesus serving as our mediator (8:6, 9:15, and 12:24).  Paul will remind Timothy of that reality in 1Timothy 2:5. We have access to God in a profound and powerful way. WOW!

This is what we are celebrating on Easter. Jesus did the work to restore our relationship with His Father conquering both sin and death.

My prayer for each of us is that we will pause and reflect on the significance of Easter. It will require facing our part in crucifying him. It will also be an opportunity to celebrate the one who was not swayed by the crowds but instead focused on his Father’s Will and extends an invitation to us for a new life and the privilege of being in His crowd.





These are socks…Hope

29 10 2014

In my last post I shared about how Coach Wooden, the legendary basketball coach for UCLA, would begin his first practice. He started off each season by teaching his team how to wear their socks stressing the importance of protecting their feet. Getting a blister on your foot makes you ineffective on the court. Bottom line remembering the basics helps you win the game.

What are the Christian’s socks? What are the basics we have to remember to be effective? I believe there are three; faith, hope and love. Today I want to focus on hope.

Hope is a well-grounded confidence that allows us to face reality. Let that sink in.

The two most common verses I use as a Chaplain are Romans 5:3-5 and James 1:2-4. Both of these passages talk about what can happen during hard times. In Romans “we rejoice in our suffering” because we will gain perseverance, our character will be revealed and we will see where we have placed our hope. James wants us to “consider it pure joy when we face trials” because the end result will be full and complete maturity.

Two people can go through the exact same circumstance. One person comes out stronger and one person comes out weaker. What was the difference? I believe it is often perspective and choice. We have to choose to become stronger and we need the right perspective to overcome our circumstances.

For Christians I believe life is a win-win situation. When we don’t have bad things happen, it is a win. When we do have bad things happen, it is also a win because we can grow and become stronger as a result of those difficult times. There is a practical truth to this. When we look back on what helped us become a better person, many times it was a difficult circumstance. There is also a profound spiritual truth to this.

As Paul mentions in Romans, our hope comes alive in suffering. If we truly believe that Jesus overcame both sin and death and one day will return, everything we are experiencing here is temporary. This does not mean I want to go through hard times. It does mean when I go through them I can have confidence this is not the end of the story. I have hope.

This hope actually allows me to face the situation for what it is. I am so thankful Jesus cried at Lazarus’ tomb in John 11. Why? Jesus knew he was going to raise him from the dead. He knew this was not the end of the story. He also knew people were hurting. They loved Lazarus and watching him die was hard and painful. He was able to connect with them and share in their sorrow. He faced reality but was not overwhelmed by the situation. He had confidence in the rest of the story.

When my socks of hope are on, I face reality with confidence. If there is injustice I can stand against it and call it injustice. Why? Because I know Jesus will one day return and make the final judgment. If I have sin in my life I can deal with it effectively. Why? Because I know Jesus died for my sins and conquered sin therefore I can overcome this area of sin in my life. When I see suffering or death I can cry and mourn with those who are mourning. Why? Because this life can be hard however I will not be overwhelmed by grief and sorrow because I know the rest of the story.

Christian hope is not simply being optimistic. It is grounded in the reality of who God is and what Jesus has done. When we let this reality settle all the way down into our socks, we have a profound hope that anchors us. We face reality boldly and we impact our world radically.

Is there something you need to face? Is there a situation you are avoiding or minimizing because your socks of hope have holes in them or haven’t been put on properly? This is when a mentor is really helpful. Talk with someone you respect who has hope in spite of difficult circumstances. They will give you wisdom and insight that will inspire you. You will need to be in prayer and take the time to really learn what the Bible has to say. God will lead and guide. The result will be a confidence to look at reality and see…hope.





Being Human

14 09 2014

Welcome to the human race!  How do you know you are a human?  Do you say, “I don’t care what other people think” but secretly do?  Do you feel like everyone else in the group “clicks” except you?  Do you have something you are ashamed or embarrassed about?  Do you feel you have to live up to an image instead of just being yourself?

I most likely hit the mark with one of those questions proving you are human.  What a relief!  We can all say “I am screwed up just like everyone else!”

I think the Apostle Paul nailed it (of course with God’s help).

He wrote in 1 Timothy 1:15-16:

“Here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners—of whom I am the worst. But for that very reason I was shown mercy so that in me, the worst of sinners, Christ Jesus might display his immense patience as an example for those who would believe in him and receive eternal life.”

Paul thought he was the worst sinner out there.  That is a very honest assessment.  Each one of us could say the same thing and believe it.  I often say the only reason Paul wrote he was the worst sinner is I wasn’t born yet.  We truly know just how bad we can be.  We are there for every single sin we commit.  We also know our thoughts and intentions.  We know what we are thinking and to be honest we can think about some pretty bad stuff.

Bottom line: Paul was human

His realistic perspective gives us hope.  If he can be redeemed.  If he can have a right relationship with God.  Then, we can be redeemed and have a right relationship with God.  This is critical because one of the most common misperceptions I hear is “I have blown it so bad there is no hope for me.” Paul reminds us there is always hope.

There is another amazing reality in this passage.  Paul does not list a whole bunch of things he has to do.  Instead he points to God’s mercy and Jesus’… patience.

You have to let that sink in.  God’s response to us being human is to give mercy and be patient.

No wonder the very next thing Paul writes is:

“Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory for ever and ever. Amen.” (Verse 17)

He had a moment of worship.  I am also humbled by the reality of these verses.  In our culture (the United States) we tend to focus on things we have to do or labels we can give.

Philip Yancey wrote a book called “What’s so Amazing about Grace.”  He shared a story in which a person is challenged to describe the gospel in a sentence.  I have modified the language but basically he said: “We are all screw-ups but God loves us anyway.”

Where are you today?  Have you bought into a lie that you are so screwed up you can not be redeemed?  Paul would disagree.  Do you believe you are redeemed but now are working so hard to maintain your relationship with God you have no joy or peace?  Paul would invite you to accept God’s mercy and be thankful for Jesus’ patience.

I love the picture of Jesus smiling and telling his Dad just how much he loves us as he shakes his head, takes a deep breath and is…patient.





#GodsNotDead

29 03 2014

Yes I have joined the world of Twitter. You can follow me at @DevosByChaps.

This last weekend I had the opportunity to watch the new movie “God’s not dead.” It was a great movie. It captured the reality that belief in God is not an intellectual debate but a personal one. I wanted to offer my thoughts on why people reject God and how to respond.

Pain and suffering. Many have begged God to cure a family member or friend from cancer or have asked for God to intervene in a horrific situation only to experience silence. They may have experienced abuse and begged God for protection only to face more abuse. Tragically some have been hurt by those claiming to be Jesus’ followers.

I don’t think there is an easy answer because they did not face an easy situation. Grace, love and prayer are the best things we can offer. We also need strong healthy churches. A healthy church creates a safe place for people who are hurting and in the middle of pain. When done well, the church offers real hope and true peace to those who suffer from the harsh realities of this world.

Avoidance of accountability. Let’s be honest, there are some things we do that we know deep down are wrong. We either justify it or remove the standard that says it is wrong. If there is no higher law ordained and established by God we can live how we want. We end up living by collective relativism. In other words, we agree as a group what is right and wrong which can and will shift depending on what we think or more often feel in the moment. God forces us to be accountable ultimately to him but also to each other.

To respond I would offer the church has to be a standard bearer of what it means to live a life of submission and obedience. That does not mean we are perfect. It does mean we role model a life of honor and integrity that is transparent. We seek forgiveness when we mess up. We also influence those around us to a higher good. We can’t live by legalism and the world has seen plenty of hypocrisy. This is a hard challenge that can really only be done if we seek to follow Jesus and submit to his leading in our life…wait! That is what we are suppose to do. I love it when a plan comes together.

Experience. We also have to be honest that you don’t need God to live a good life or even make a great impact on the world. Many people experience life apart from God and are happy and content. Then, they hear talking points explaining why God is an antiquated idea and it matches with their experiences. Therefore, those talking points become theirs.

Jesus does not promise an easy life or even a good life. He does offer a meaningful life filled with purpose. He helps us focus beyond the here and now and enables us to have broader perspective. Once again I find myself calling for churches to be healthy places that send out healthy Christians into the world. Our lives and our experiences can present an alternative to their talking points. It can create a space where faith is a possibility. Combined with prayer and an understanding that ultimately it is between God and that person, I believe we can offer a compelling case.

Here is the great part. Our faith has incredible depth. I am thankful for people like Ravi Zacharias and Tim Keller who do a phenomenal job of explaining why we can have confidence in our faith. I am also thankful for a movie like “God’s not Dead” that demonstrates we do not need to shrink back from a debate about our faith. We just have to recognize that at the end of the day it is a personal relationship. If all it took to win someone to Jesus Christ was a really good argument it would have been done a long time ago.

So what can you do? Step back and pray about the people in your life who have rejected Christianity. Let God lead and guide you. Trust me God cares about having a relationship with that person way more than you do. If there is an opportunity to have a thoughtful conversation don’t seek to win the argument instead seek to understand the person. If there are questions, know that there are great resources out there. Look at those resources together. Second, be authentic. If you struggle with something admit that you struggle with it. Role model being genuine. Next, pray, pray and pray some more. It will remind you only God changes hearts. Finally, make sure your church is a healthy place for people to come. We need healthy faith communities where we can encourage one another and be a beacon to the world.

It is amazing that God invites us to be his ambassadors to the world. He desires to work through you and me to touch lives and make an impact. It is a great privilege. Oh and in case you were wondering…God is definitely not dead, he is ALIVE!





Agents of Grace

28 02 2014

Have you ever read something and did a double take. You reread it just to make sure it said what you think it said. That happened to me as I was reading Exodus. In Exodus 24:9-11 we are told about Moses, Aaron and his sons along with the seventy elders going up to see God. Verse 11 is what made me pause, “But God did not raise his hand against these leaders…”

The reason I did a double take is God was the one who invited them up. Why would he raise his hand against them? Here are my thoughts.

At the end of the day God is holy. He also has the true “big picture.” As he saw these men walking up, he would have known that Aaron would soon fail as a leader and make an idol for the Israelites to worship (Exodus 32). Aaron’s sons would choose to disregard the requirements laid out by God for proper worship and would put God in the position of maintaining the holiness of the Tabernacle (Leviticus 10). You could add to this the number of times the Israelites would complain and talk about how good life was when they were slaves. The seventy elders never seemed to help lead the people in a better direction. Instead they just went along with the crowd.

Have you ever had a meeting with someone you know is bad? Have you ever gone to a function where a person who makes really poor choices is placed at the same table as you? Thanks to the power of Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and other internet tools we can “raise our hand against them.” We can fire off that perfect poke in the eye. We can bash them and get “likes.” We can even text while we talk with them making sure people know what an idiot they are.

I am thankful God takes a different approach. God extends grace. At the core we see God’s desire to have a relationship with us. His desire will result in inviting guys like Aaron to eat with him. It also meant Jesus would get the reputation of being a glutton and drunkard (Matthew 11:19).

Technology is allowing us to set our own borders. We can isolate ourselves with “friends” who are just like us. When we argue, we seem to be crueler and sharper in our attacks with those not in our circle. In an ocean of words we feel the only way we can be heard is if we get creatively ugly.

The world is in desperate need of the unique grace offered by God. I say unique because in our own circles we tend to be really good about sending encouraging and uplifting messages. There is never a shortage of inspirational stories or pictures on my Facebook news feed. What if we extended grace outside our circles? What if we did something kind for a person we despise? What if we took Jesus seriously and loved our enemies?

God never condones sin. There are plenty of examples where God steps in and demonstrates justice and holiness. God also extends grace. God does it perfectly. The rest of us do it a little less than perfectly. There will be times when we need to take a stand because something is immoral or harmful. I would offer there are plenty of times we can follow God’s example and extend grace.

Grace changes the world. Grace tears down walls, restores relationships and offers hope. Ultimately it was God’s grace that opened the door for our salvation.

Will it be hard? Yes. Will we be misunderstood? Likely. We will always get it right? If you are like me, no. However, if we focus on grace and extend it to others then I think we can have the opportunity to truly impact our world.

There is also a blessing that comes back to us. I wanted to write about grace. God is awesome in bringing things together. Where I ended up is different from my initial thoughts. I wanted to remind us that we live by grace. God tweaked my message to focus on offering grace outside our circle of friends. However, I believe as we offer grace the byproduct will be a reminder of the grace given to us. God loves you and me not because of what we do. As we meet with God, he knows how we will blow it next week. However, he loves us and desires to have a relationship with us. He doesn’t raise his hand against us. Instead, he extends grace and offers us a seat.

Our challenge for this upcoming week is to be an agent of grace. Some of you need to accept God’s grace. All of us need to be intentional about looking beyond our circle of friends and finding a way to show grace. I am going to trust God on this one. Say a prayer and ask God who you need to give grace to.
Warning: God is most likely going to bring up the one person you absolutely do not want to give any grace to. He does that to grow you. Trust me it will be worth it.

What will it look like? It may be going out to lunch with someone you normally would not eat with. It may be saying an encouraging word to someone you normally ignore. It may be asking forgiveness for your part in why a relationship has soured. It will be critical that there be no strings attached. You are simply following Jesus.

My prayer is we will be agents of grace in the weeks to come. It will give God an opportunity to work through us bring hope, peace and reconciliation. If you are like me you are very thankful and humbled by God’s grace. Those we give grace to will hopefully be grateful but no matter what you will have given them a snapshot of God’s heart.

PS. Yes God has prompted me on who I need to extend grace to. I am praying about how to do it well.





Unfairness

1 05 2013

I love that the Bible is willing to say what we are thinking. The book of Ecclesiastes does a great job of capturing a common frustration.
Chapter 9 verse11:
“I have seen something else under the sun: The race is not to the swift or the battle to the strong, nor does food come to the wise or wealth to the brilliant or favor to the learned; but time and chance happen to them all.”

This verse is a stinging reality. A great person loses their job while an incompetent person is promoted. A phenomenal singer never gets their big break while a mediocre singer becomes a star. As I was thinking of a third example, it was humbling because many of the struggles I could mention would be painful to others.

Life is not fair. I struggle in those moments and try to figure out what I did wrong. Maybe I didn’t pray hard enough or there something I should have done differently. Of course, I know I am reading too much into it but sometimes there was something I could have done differently making the waters muddy. It can be very frustrating and can drive me crazy if I let it.

Here is the interesting part. The Bible does not try to answer why these things happen. Instead it just lays out the picture and lets us see reality. Acts 12 captures this. The beginning of the chapter starts with the Apostle James being killed and Peter being arrested with it being clear he would face the same fate. The church prays and Peter is miraculously released from prison. Did the church not pray for James? Were they suppose to do more? Could James have been saved? The Bible is silent. It just tells us that James was killed and Peter was saved.

This is when our faith is stretched to its limits. Those of us who have been around the block can quote Romans 8:28: “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” The question is, when we are alone and truly honest with ourselves, do we believe it?

I keep coming back to yes.

It is not because things always work out for me. It is because when I look at the world without God, there is harshness and a lack of depth that I reject. When I look to God, I find a depth of love and peace that grounds me and a hope that sustains me. The result of an unfair world is my focus is sharpened, my relationships become deeper and I become stronger. In other words, God and I get the last laugh.

We all know someone who is facing a frustrating and unfair situation. Would you take some time to pray for them? Yes, we should always pray for a miraculous intervention like Peter received. We should also pray for God’s love and peace to shine through and for the person to grow and mature remembering “time and chance” will be overcome by love and eternity.





Just an ordinary day

18 04 2013

For the United States Monday was a terrible day. It was a reminder of people’s capacity to do evil. It was also a reminder of people’s capacity to do good. Many ran towards the scene to help demonstrating compassion and courage.

As Christians we see these acts of good and evil and it reminds us what the Bible teaches. In Genesis 2 God offered Adam and Eve a beautiful creation with an understanding they would trust and obey. True trust and true obedience requires the ability to choose to not trust and to not obey. God placed a tree in their midst that would allow them to make that choice. They were told to not eat from a tree known as the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Notice it was not called the evil tree. It was a tree with a fruit on it that if eaten would cause us to trust in ourselves more than God and would lead us to set up our own rules rather than obey God’s. Chapter 3 tells us Adam and Eve choose to eat from the tree. Fast forward and we have Monday.

Thankfully God did not give up on us. In fact, God loved us so much he went the full distance and died for us. Thankfully that was not the end of the story. Just weeks ago we celebrated Easter and God’s victory over sin and death. There is this hope Christians have that the evil of this world is limited. We are hopeful because God offers to transform us. As we choose to trust and obey God, we see our lives changed. Hope becomes our calling card. God established the church to be a gathering place for those who have been transformed with the understanding we would go out and make this world a better place.

By now you should be trying to figure out what my title (Just an ordinary day) has to do with what I have shared so far. I am glad you asked.

What if those who were responsible for the evil on Monday had encountered Jesus? What if there was a healthy church with people who reached out in their neighborhood? What if they made a commitment to trust and obey God?

They would have been transformed and Monday would have been just an ordinary day.

If you will offer me a little grace I would like to push us. Sadly in this world there are places where Monday would have been just an ordinary day. Places like Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and other places that don’t make the news in the U.S. face events like Monday far too frequently. When Americans hear those stories, we are saddened but quickly move on and worry about dinner. What if there were healthy churches there? What if lives were transformed? What if they had hope?

As Christians we have a powerful message. Let us commit to making our churches healthy. Let us reach out and make our communities better places. Let us also commit the next time we hear a story of a bombing in another part of the world that we will pause and pray just as hard as we prayed Monday remembering that God loves the world and the church is global.





Running for President in 2016…

12 01 2013

Not!  When you saw the title did you groan?  Are you sick of politics? We just finished being bombarded with election ads when we began enduring the drama of the “Fiscal Cliff.” In the midst of the drama tragedy struck in Connecticut. Our political leaders are now engaged in the discussion on gun control and access to mental health care. As I have been watching everything unfold, it struck me just how limited government’s power is from a human perspective. Because this is not a political blog, I will ignore the debate about the role of government. That is for others. I want to focus on the church and would offer that we have the ability to address the human dynamic.

What am I talking about? I am glad you asked. Can you legislate compassion? Can you pass a law to make someone love another person? Is there a form you can fill out that will distribute joy? While laws may be able to outlaw certain behaviors, they can never impact the underlying traits that govern those behaviors. To prove this all you have to do is talk to a person who experiences hate and bigotry even though they don’t experience any illegal discrimination.

There is a temptation to find the magical law that will solve those underlying traits. When the church goes down that road, we call it legalism. Legalism is simply the misguided belief that laws solve heart problems.

I was reading a philosophy book and the author did a classic move. He quoted a commentary about how the world was going downhill and how hopeless things were becoming. The author then asked the reader to guess when the commentary was written. It read like it was written today but in fact it was written during the time of Plato. Human problems are timeless and as old as … humans.

The Apostle Paul wrote in Romans 4:18, “Against all hope, Abraham in hope believed…”

The church operates in terms such as faith, hope and love. We are God’s instrument to bring his message to the world. We have the freedom to create healthy communities not constrained by boarders, political ideology or ethnic background.  If there ever was a time for the church to engage now is that time.

Take some time to ask yourself the following questions:

1) Am I a part of a church?  We must understand the danger of individualism that says we can do this on our own. We can’t. We need each other.

2) Is my church safe and inviting? In other words, is it a place anyone can come to seek God, get help or simply receive prayer?

3) Is my church healthy? I understand this question is subjective. It will require both a gut check and time in prayer asking God. That is okay. Remember there is no rule that you will be able to pass that will make it healthy. It is a question focused on the human dynamic and our relationship with God and each other.

If you identified growth areas for your church, what are you going to do about it? Often times when we see shortcomings it is easy to pass along blame or make sure a rule is passed to make everyone become like me. We need more than that. We need ownership, responsibility and a deepening relationship with God.

Politicians will continue to debate. Discussions are already underway about who will run in 2016. Laws will be passed that may help within their limited capacity.

My prayer is the church will stand up and be counted. We will operate in our currency of faith, hope and love. We will stay true to Jesus and avoid the dangers of legalism. We have answers to the human condition. Just like Abraham we are able to hope even if there appears to be no reason to hope.





The day after – the shepherds’ perspective

28 12 2011

For every holiday or major event there is the day after.  It is a time to catch your breath and reflect on how things went.  Life starts to go back to normal.  Decorations come down and we get back into our regular routines.  As I reflected on that, it made me pause and think about the shepherds from Luke 2.  They were taken completely by surprise.  It was not a holiday for them.  They were working the night shift like they normally did when suddenly an angel appeared and told them it was an incredibly special night.  The Messiah had arrived!  Then, there was a large group of angels praising God.  They went to where the angel told them to go and then told everyone they could about what happened.  (Luke 2:8-20)

If the shepherds had attended services at the temple, they would have known one day a Messiah would come.  They would have anticipated a renewed kingdom and images from the days of King Solomon would have been in their mind.  Roman occupation would soon be over.  What an exciting time.  Then, a year went by and no change.  Two years and life was still the same.  Ten, twenty years, nothing significant changed, life went on.  Finally, after thirty years the baby they had seen in the manger starting doing something.  However, the message he was sharing was far different than what they were expecting.  He wasn’t building an army or preparing to overthrow Rome.  After three years he was executed.  His follower’s started telling stories of him rising from the dead but that would have just sounded crazy.

I wonder if they doubted.  They had seen the angel and saw exactly what the angel told them they would see.  However, everything else pointed to this being some sort of mistake.  If they did see Jesus when he began his earthly ministry, then they may have understood.  Being shepherds would have meant they were looked down upon by most people.  Jesus always had a special place for people everyone else rejected.  That would have given them a special connection to Jesus.  I wonder if he told them it was good to see them again.  Even then I think it would have been hard to grasp what God was doing.

It is a great reminder for all of us.  We should enjoy and appreciate when we have experiences that show God’s work in our lives.  However, our hope rests in God and not in our experiences.  We can easily be caught in a trap of chasing after experiences.  We may believe that without experiences we have no hope or God has forgotten us.  That was not the case for the shepherds and it is not the case for us.

Will God give us experiences?  Absolutely.  The shepherds were given and incredible gift.  An ordinary night was turned extraordinary by a loving and giving God.  However, if I don’t have an experience it does not mean God is not working.  It just means God is working in a way I can’t see right now.  My hope rests firmly in God and not experiences.

This week I invite you to think back to a time you experienced God.  Thank him for that time.  Then, ask yourself the question; are you chasing after God or after another experience?  If in the honesty of your heart you admit that you are chasing after an experience ask God to forgive you and start looking for ways seek after God.

For some, either you have not had a powerful experience with God or it has been a long time and you are losing hope or doubting.  First, I am sorry.  I know it is a hard place to be.  Second, I would encourage you to take a bold step.  Thank God for the work he is doing that you cannot see.  Focus on your hope in God and not in experiences that will come and go.

It is possible the shepherds never had another amazing experience like that night for the rest of their lives.  However, at the same time they didn’t experience anything, God was doing something amazing.  His son was on earth preparing to face death to give us eternal hope.  Yeah, I think it is safe to say God was working.





Good Model Great Reminder

1 12 2011

I like looking at models. They help you get a better understanding of whatever object they represent. Then when you see the real thing, you have a better appreciation of it. One of the classic tasks engineering students have to do is build a model of a bridge. It is small but they get to see the basic principles at work. Their small bridge is tested. If they missed something the only thing damaged is pride and some Popsicle sticks. If they got it right they can have a better understand of the bridge they will walk on when they go back to their dorm room.

The author of Hebrews tells us that the Old Testament tabernacle was a model of something much larger. As I was looking at one of the passages from Hebrews an insight leaped out to me that I wanted to pass along. I want us to look at the sacrificial system in the Old Testament and see if we can pull some larger truths out of that model.

If you study the sacrificial system, there were three principles that stood out to me.

1. The expectation was you only took the best to be your offering. It would be the first born from your flocks. It could not have any defects at all. It would be the first fruits from whatever you harvested. In other words, it would be costly.

2. This was not a private affair. You had to go to the temple. The priest had to be involved. You could not just go into your backyard and have a private ceremony. Your sacrifice would happen in the community.

3. The focus was on both the holiness of God and the holiness of the people. When you sinned against another person, you had to pay restitution but you also had to sacrifice to God because ultimately you sinned against God. It was a reminder your sin damaged your relationships with both God and others.

This system would have created a longing for God’s mercy. It would have created a hunger for an ultimate sacrifice that would take away sin once and for all.

The amazing thing was to reflect and see there is very practical application of the sacrificial system on our understanding of sin.

1. Sin is costly. It takes the best from us. When I am caught up in sin, I have to take my focus off good things. I become distracted. I become ineffective. My best energy is not available to encourage and support the people around me. I am lost in my own world. I don’t care about the needs of my wife; I only care about my own needs. I miss opportunities to connect with my kids because I am distracted. Friends around me who need help are left to face their issues alone because I have my own issues to deal with. Sin costs us.

2. Sin is a community affair. When I sin, it doesn’t just impact me. If I look at pornography all by myself even if I was single, there is still an impact. Women become objects instead of human. My desires and fantasies cloud my ability to honor anyone I am with. Private sins seep out and poison my relationships. Anger, bitterness, deceitfulness all become the way I manage my life. I start to assume the worst of the people around me because they must secretly be doing the same thing I am doing. Sin is never isolated. It hurts everyone.

3. Sin offends God. When I lose my temper and take it out on someone, I not only hurt that person. I hurt God. God is the one who manages anger. God leads me in way to properly express anger. When I am out of control, I am telling God he is an idiot and has no idea how to deal with the situation I am in. I sin against God. I not only need to apologize to the person, I need to seek God’s forgiveness as well.

Sin creates a longing for God’s mercy. It creates a hunger for an ultimate sacrifice that would take away sin once and for all.

The old covenant with the sacrificial system helped me understand my sin.

The new covenant established by Jesus Christ deals with my sin.

This is what the author of Hebrews was getting at. In chapter 10 he tells us:

“But those sacrifices are an annual reminder of sins, because it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins.” (Verses 3 and 4)

“Then he said, ‘Here I am, I have come to do your will.’ He sets aside the first to establish the second. And by that will, we have been made holy through the sacrifice of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.” (Verses 9 and 10)

We can actually be holy.

Now my best really can be given to God.

Now I can look for opportunities to serve the people around me and really make a difference.

Now I can be in right relationship with God and you.

That longing for God’s mercy is fulfilled. That hunger for a sacrifice that can truly cover my sin is met.

It is an incredibly powerful truth. My life can be transformed into something amazing. This last Sunday we lit the first candle of Advent, it was the candle of hope. Because of this truth we can have hope.

Where are you at?

Are you trapped by some issue that is stopping you from being who you want to be? Are you seeing a sin in your life that is costing you and hurting both you and the people around you? Are you feeling convicted because you see that you have also sinned against God? I have some great news. Acknowledge the sacrifice Jesus made for you and talk with someone you trust about what that means.

If you were like me and humbled by the reminder of what Jesus has done for us and the hope we have, take some time to say thank you. I hope it continues to build your excitement as we prepare to celebrate what the Christmas season is truly about.

God bless,

Chaps